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Seraphim Yefimov
Seraphim Yefimov

One Late Night


One Late Night is a short immersive horror-game experience, starring an unnamed graphic designer employee, working late one night at the office, until strange things start to happen. The basic idea is that players who have been in similar situations, and worked with similar office jobs, will relate themselves to the game setting and scenario and become immersed. Even if you can't relate to the game storyline, you will still get a good experience. The storyline is presented with short monologues, displaying the thoughts of the player, as you need to perform certain tasks to proceed in the game to continue discover new clues about what's going on.




One Late Night



You are an employee of Webcom who is working late at the office one night. After assuring Linda that you will be home soon, you drift off to sleep. Before you know it, it's past midnight and you still have work to do. You head off to the break room to get some much-needed coffee, but something in the office is amiss...


The protagonist appears to be a worker of the Webcom which is working in the night. It is believed that the worker is a male, since he gets ringed by his wife Linda telling her he will come home soon. He ends up falling asleep from all the work.


He ends up making himself coffee to stay awake. Until he realizes something is strange in the building. Which escalated in him finding Black Window stalking him and trying to murder him. He ends up thinking strategically how to escape the building and get home as quick as possible.


One Late Night is a short immersive horror-game experience, starring an unnamed graphic designer employee, working late one night at the office, until strange things start to happen. The basic idea is that players who have been in similar situations, and worked with similar office jobs, will relate themselves to the game setting and scenario and become immersed. Even if you can't relate to the game storyline, you will still get a good experience. The storyline is presented with short monologues, displaying the thoughts of the player, as you need to perform certain tasks to proceed in the game to continue discover new clues about what's going on. Use your surroundings to your advantage and hide under desks and in corners to avoid being taken by the ghost which haunts the office. Remember that the light will always be your friend. Survive the night and find as many clues as you can about the threat.


The basic idea is that players who have been in similar situations, and worked with similar office jobs, will relate themselves to the game setting and scenario and become immersed. Even if you can't relate to the game storyline, you will still get a good experience. The storyline is presented with short monologues, displaying the thoughts of the player, as you need to perform certain tasks to proceed in the game to continue discover new clues about what's going on.


Use your surroundings to your advantage and hide under desks and in corners to avoid being taken by the ghost which haunts the office. Remember that the light will always be your friend. Survive the night and find as many clues as you can about the threat.


When Donald Trump was President of the United States, he often got distracted by what the media and Hollywood were saying about him instead of focusing on his job in Washington, D.C. He was known to be a rabid TV watcher, and often, the jokes by one certain late-night comedian got the best of him.


In flashback, a young boy in his room overhears his father and pregnant mother fighting; his father shouts that he's leaving the family, and "hates that kid." 25 years later, at a bar, a man flirts with a girl, who abruptly says, "Drop dead." In a diner booth, three factory workers banter with the cook and waitress. Outside, a man offers cards to passersby, preaching, "God loves you." In the booth, Larry reluctantly describes an incident earlier at the factory: he was pursuing an office girl who, when she saw him coming, went the other way. Co-workers tried to persuade him to leave her alone. One, Riley, tried to tell him of the girl's religion, but Larry called him a "fake", and himself a "heathen." The boss summons Larry to his office to tell him of the complaint the girl filed, and orders him to leave her alone; Larry ends up calling him a fake as well. In the diner, the friends marvel at Larry's boldness. Outside, the preacher meets a man who acknowledges everything he says. The man enters the diner to sit at the counter. Larry pesters him for a conversation and, finding out that he is a Christian, taunts the man by calling him "Jesus" and questioning why other Christians are fakes. After Larry verbally accosts him several times, and messes with his food, the man tells him, "God loves you." Larry denies this increasingly aggressively, finally yelling in the man's face about his broken home, his lack of a wife or girlfriend, and his long history of prison time, grabs the passive man by the collar and demands to know how God loves him. The cook breaks it up, and the man leaves. Larry gets up to follow the man, and tries to pay the bill, but the cook reveals that "Jesus" paid it.


One Late Night is a "short immersive horror-game experience" made by Black Curtain Studio as Freeware in 2013. It's a very simple story: you are working one late night, alone in your office. And it turns out your office is haunted.


What I really like about it is that this is a situation I have been in before. No, not the ghost part, I mean the office part. I've worked in a number of offices in my time, and I have often been in a situation where I was working late, alone. It's evident that the makers of the game have been there, too. They know the sounds of the office late at night: the whirs and clicks of the fax machines and printers, the hum of your computer, the gurgling from the coffeemaker as you struggle to stay awake long enough to get that badly-needed project emailed to your boss. During the day, these sounds are masked by the people around you. Even if they're not talking, their mere presence is sufficient to distract from the omnipresent buzz that comes from office life.


If ever you are in a situation where you are working alone at night, I want you to try something for me. Turn everything off (or as much as can be allowed without causing you to be fired when you accidentally wipe the company server). Lights, computers, printers, everything. You will be amazed at the silence. Now consider how you live with that noise every day.


With One Late Night, it's taking those familiar noises and sights and turning them into another context. You know you're playing a horror game. You know something bad is going to happen. You're just waiting for the other shoe to drop. And in the meantime, the office hums around you, as if to say "but it's just another ordinary night, isn't it?"


On one level, Gutfeld succeeds today because he has virtually no competition from fellow conservatives in the late-night television comedy space. On another, he thrives because the current media industry moment is built not for a big tent of all viewers, but for audiences who share specific demographic, psychographic and political traits.


The One Late Night game places you alone at night in a large corporate office. Things start out okay but soon you start seeing and hearing very creepy and scary things. It is your job to piece together the clues and solve the puzzles to finally understand what is going on. Meanwhile you have to hide and run for your life as the creepy things try to steal you away.


Insomnia Cookies may soon bring late-night baked goods to students in Harvard Square, according to a Boston Business Journal report. The 22-location chain is spread around the country, mostly in close proximity to college students, obviously the demographic most likely to be binging on cookies at 3 AM. The company is looking at a vacant spot on 65 Mt. Auburn St., a mere block from many Harvard dorms, and they will deliver from 6 PM to 3 AM for as little as $7. Cookies start at $1.25 each, but students looking to impress their entire residence hall can shell out the big bucks for bulk orders and sampler packs. Milk, of course, is also available.


Meanwhile, the kids over at Tufts are all like, "Been there, done that." A guy in a bright orange jumpsuit has been biking around town delivering late-night cookies (chocolate chip! Snickerdoodles!) since January, five for $5 with no delivery fee, under the name Sweet Idea. Sweet indeed. As each company has a fairly limited delivery radius, we probably won't see any late-night cookie deliveryman duels anytime soon.


There are, however, some interesting battles emerging across the broadcast networks involving Jimmy Kimmel Live!, The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, Late Night with Seth Meyers and The Late Late Show with James Corden.


The late-night ecosystem has changed a lot over the past 20 years and the battle for linear eyeballs is not as pronounced as it was, particularly under Jay Leno and David Letterman, but there is still healthy competition at 11:30 p.m. The hosts of these shows are known to get along well, accentuated by working together in some ways during the pandemic, but there is obviously still interest from their teams and the networks to do well against the competition.


There's something really rich about the fact that the film's biggest problem is trying to convince you that anyone can write a really funny traditional, topical, late-night monologue that late-night audiences would want to listen to. That's not how the real Mindy Kaling is funny. (Is that really how anybody funny is funny?) Despite those problems, there's a lot here, about alliances and debts owed, and about the regrettably transactional relationships between white bosses and anyone they hire and push forward as a defense against charges of bias. I'm not sure the film gets all of this right, but it's an intriguing, enjoyable, well-cast effort. 041b061a72


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